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1. Experiences Build Brain Architecture
 
01:57
The basic architecture of the brain is constructed through a process that begins early in life and continues into adulthood. Simpler circuits come first and more complex brain circuits build on them later. Genes provide the basic blueprint, but experiences influence how or whether genes are expressed. Together, they shape the quality of brain architecture and establish either a sturdy or a fragile foundation for all of the learning, health, and behavior that follow. Plasticity, or the ability for the brain to reorganize and adapt, is greatest in the first years of life and decreases with age. This video is part one of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. Also from the "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" Series: 2. Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry: http://youtu.be/m_5u8-QSh6A 3. Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development: http://youtu.be/rVwFkcOZHJw For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/multimedia/videos/three_core_concepts/
3. Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development
 
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Learning how to cope with adversity is an important part of healthy development. While moderate, short-lived stress responses in the body can promote growth, toxic stress is the strong, unrelieved activation of the body's stress management system in the absence of protective adult support. Without caring adults to buffer children, the unrelenting stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, or severe maternal depression can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health. This video is part three of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. Also from the "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" Series 1. Experiences Build Brain Architecture: http://youtu.be/VNNsN9IJkws 2. Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry: http://youtu.be/m_5u8-QSh6A For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/multimedia/videos/three_core_concepts/
InBrief: The Science of Neglect
 
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Learn more about the science of neglect on our website: https://goo.gl/wUtAw9 Extensive biological and developmental research shows significant neglect—the ongoing disruption or significant absence of caregiver responsiveness—can cause more lasting harm to a young child's development than overt physical abuse, including subsequent cognitive delays, impairments in executive functioning, and disruptions of the body's stress response. This edition of the InBrief series explains why significant deprivation is so harmful in the earliest years of life and why effective interventions are likely to pay significant dividends in better long-term outcomes in learning, health, and parenting of the next generation. This 6-minute video provides an overview of The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain, a Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.
2. Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry
 
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One of the most essential experiences in shaping the architecture of the developing brain is "serve and return" interaction between children and significant adults in their lives. Young children naturally reach out for interaction through babbling, facial expressions, and gestures, and adults respond with the same kind of vocalizing and gesturing back at them. This back-and-forth process is fundamental to the wiring of the brain, especially in the earliest years. This video is part two of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. Also from the "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" Series 1. Experiences Build Brain Architecture: http://youtu.be/VNNsN9IJkws 3. Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development: http://youtu.be/rVwFkcOZHJw For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/multimedia/videos/three_core_concepts/
InBrief: Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning
 
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Learn more about executive function: https://goo.gl/QGAUUd Find activities for developing executive function skills: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/activities-guide-enhancing-and-practicing-executive-function-skills-with-children-from-infancy-to-adolescence/ Being able to focus, hold, and work with information in mind, filter distractions, and switch gears is like having an air traffic control system at a busy airport to manage the arrivals and departures of dozens of planes on multiple runways. In the brain, this air traffic control mechanism is called executive functioning, a group of skills that helps us to focus on multiple streams of information at the same time, and revise plans as necessary. This edition of the InBrief series explains how these lifelong skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. Acquiring the early building blocks of these skills is one of the most important and challenging tasks of the early childhood years, and having the right support and experiences through middle childhood, adolescence, and into early adult life is essential for the successful development of these capacities. This 5-minute video provides an overview of Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function, the joint Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp11/ For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/ Major funding support for this video has been provided by: Bezos Family Foundation, Birth to Five Policy Alliance, Buffett Early Childhood Fund, Casey Family Programs, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation
InBrief: The Science of Resilience
 
02:30
One way to understand the development of resilience is to picture a balance scale or seesaw. Protective experiences and adaptive skills on one side counterbalance significant adversity on the other. Watch this video to visualize the science of resilience, and see how genes and experience interact to produce positive outcomes for children. This InBrief video is part two of a three-part sequence about resilience. These videos provide an overview of Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience, a working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp13/
En Breve: La Función Ejecutiva -- Habilidades para la vida y el aprendizaje
 
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Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
Building Adult Capabilities to Improve Child Outcomes: A Theory of Change
 
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This 5-minute video depicts a theory of change from the Frontiers of Innovation community for achieving breakthrough outcomes for vulnerable children and families. It describes the need to focus on building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form the environment of relationships essential to children's lifelong learning, health, and behavior. View part 2 that addresses how children and adults can build these capabilities: https://youtu.be/6NehuwDA45Q Learn more about Frontiers of Innovation: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/foi
InBrief: How Resilience is Built
 
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Children are not born with resilience, which is produced through the interaction of biological systems and protective factors in the social environment. The active ingredients in building resilience are supportive relationships with parents, coaches, teachers, caregivers, and other adults in the community. Watch this video to learn how responsive exchanges with adults help children build the skills they need to manage stress and cope with adversity. This InBrief video is part three of a three-part sequence about resilience. These videos provide an overview of Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience, a working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp13/
InBrief: What is Resilience?
 
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The science of resilience can help us understand why some children do well despite serious adversity. Resilience is a combination of protective factors that enable people to adapt in the face of serious hardship, and is essential to ensuring that children who experience adversity can still become healthy, productive citizens. Watch this video to learn about the fundamentals of resilience, which is built through interactions between children and their environments. This InBrief video is part one of a three-part sequence about resilience. These videos provide an overview of Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience, a working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp13/
InBrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development
 
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This edition of the InBrief series addresses basic concepts of early childhood development, established over decades of neuroscience and behavioral research, which help illustrate why child development—particularly from birth to five years—is a foundation for a prosperous and sustainable society. For more information about the InBrief series and the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/briefs/inbrief_series/
InBrief: The Impact of Early Adversity on Children's Development
 
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This edition of the InBrief series outlines basic concepts from the research on the biology of stress which show that major adversity can weaken developing brain architecture and permanently set the body's stress response system on high alert. Science also shows that providing stable, responsive environments for children in the earliest years of life can prevent or reverse these conditions, with lifelong consequences for learning, behavior, and health. For more information about the InBrief series and the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/briefs/inbrief_series/
En Breve: La Ciencia del Desarrollo Infantil Temprano
 
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Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
En Breve: Los Cimientos de la Salud a lo Largo de la Vida
 
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Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
En Breve: La Ciencia de la Negligencia
 
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Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
En Breve: El Impacto de la Adversidad Durante la Infancia Sobre el Desarrollo de los Niños
 
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Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
InBrief: Early Childhood Mental Health
 
05:07
Science tells us that the foundations of sound mental health are built early in life. Early experiences—including children’s relationships with parents, caregivers, relatives, teachers, and peers—interact with genes to shape the architecture of the developing brain. Disruptions in this developmental process can impair a child’s capacities for learning and relating to others, with lifelong implications. This edition of the InBrief series explains how improving children’s environments of relationships and experiences early in life can prevent initial difficulties from destabilizing later development and mental health. The 5-minute video provides an overview of Establishing a Level Foundation for Life: Mental Health Begins in Early Childhood, a working paper by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. Read more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp6/ For more information on the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/
InBrief: The Foundations of Lifelong Health
 
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This edition of the InBrief series explains why a vital and productive society with a prosperous and sustainable future is built on a foundation of healthy child development. The video summarizes findings from The Foundations of Lifelong Health Are Built in Early Childhood, a report co-authored by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs. For more information about the InBrief series and the Center on the Developing Child, visit http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/briefs/inbrief_series/
How Children and Adults Can Build Core Capabilities for Life
 
05:34
Every day we take on the ordinary, sometimes challenging, tasks of work, school, parenting, relationships, and just managing our busy lives. How do we navigate these tasks successfully? And what can send us off course? Science offers an explanation. This 5-minute video explores the development and use of core capabilities — known as executive function and self-regulation skills — from early childhood into adolescence and adulthood. Building on the Center's 2013 video presenting the theory that building adult capabilities is necessary to improve child outcomes, this new video describes what these skills are, why they are important, how they develop, and how they are affected by stress. It combines an allegorical "scribe" storytelling technique with new animation of brain development to show how positive conditions support the development of these skills, and how adverse conditions make it harder to build and use them.
Brain Hero
 
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In 2009, the Center on the Developing Child launched a collaboration with the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California (USC) to develop and test new ways of communicating the science of early childhood development using interactive media. The "Brain Hero" video, depicting how actions by a range of people in the family and community impact child development, is the first product of this collaboration. This 3-minute video adapts the visual sensibility of interactive game models to a video format. Based loosely on such games as "Guitar Hero," "SimCity," and "The Game of Life," the video portrays how actions taken by parents, teachers, policymakers, and others can affect life outcomes for both the child and the surrounding community. This collaboration, now between the Harvard Center and USC's newly launched Creative Media & Behavioral Health Center will continue joint work on the creation and dissemination of innovative storytelling products designed to inform the public discourse around policies and practices that support healthy brain development during childhood. For more information, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu Major funding support for this collaboration has been provided by: Birth to Five Policy Alliance, Buffett Early Childhood Fund, Casey Family Programs, Harvard University, and the Norlien Foundation.
Super Cerebro (Spanish translation of Brain Hero)
 
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Super Cerebro is the Spanish translation of Brain Hero, a three-minute video depicting how actions by a range of people in the family and community can affect a child's development. Brain Hero was created as part of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University's collaboration with the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California to develop and test new ways of communicating the science of early childhood development. For more information about the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/ The translation and adaptation of this video into Spanish was made possible with major support from Lincos: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lincos/1411352455749854
The Case for Science-Based Innovation in Early Childhood
 
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Center Director Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., describes the mission of the Center on the Developing Child and its vision for using science to innovate in the early childhood field and fundamentally change the lives of children facing adversity. For more information about the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu
La teoría del cambio para el desarrollo infantil: Crear capacidades en los adultos
 
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Translated into Spanish, this 5-minute video depicts a theory of change from the Frontiers of Innovation community for achieving breakthrough outcomes for vulnerable children and families. It describes the need to focus on building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form the environment of relationships essential to children’s lifelong learning, health, and behavior. The translation for this video was produced with support from U-ERRE. For more Spanish translations of the Center's resources, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resourcecategory/spanish-resources/
Intergenerational Mobility Project: Building Adult Capabilities for Family Success
 
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The Intergenerational Mobility Project uses a coaching framework to strengthen families’ ability to navigate the complexities of poverty. Drawing on parents’ desire to advocate for their children and be case managers of their own lives, mentors and families use the Bridge to Self-Sufficiency to plan for the future. When parents can align and prioritize goals for their family’s stability, well-being, education, finances, and career, they build a solid foundation for their children’s future and move across the economic divide. Learn more about the Intergenerational Mobility Project in this Innovation in Action profile: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/intergen-mobility-project/ Read more about Frontiers of Innovation: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/frontiers-of-innovation/
InBrief: Early Childhood Program Effectiveness
 
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This edition of the InBrief series outlines basic concepts from four decades of program evaluation research which help explain how society can ensure that children have a solid foundation for a productive future by creating and implementing effective early childhood programs and policies. For more information about the InBrief series and the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/briefs/inbrief_series/
FIND: Using Science to Coach Caregivers
 
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At Children's Home Society of Washington, social service providers are using video clips of parents interacting with their young children to help the parents identify their own strengths and learn which interactions best promote healthy development. Created in partnership with researchers at the University of Oregon and Oregon Social Learning Center, this intervention supports positive interactions in young families facing adversity and models an innovative co-creation and testing process for science-based strategies. To learn more about FIND, view this Innovation in Action profile: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/find/ Read more about Frontiers of Innovation: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/frontiers-of-innovation/
Innovation in Washington State
 
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In 2011, Washington state was chosen as the first state in the nation to collaborate with the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) community to improve outcomes for vulnerable children and families. Launched in May 2011, FOI focuses on the work of a community of more than 400 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, philanthropists, and experts in systems change from across North America. The goal of FOI is to bring about substantially greater positive impacts for vulnerable young children whose needs (or the needs of their caregivers) are not being fully met by existing policies and programs. To do that, FOI seeks to spur the field by forging cross-sector collaborations that prompt creativity, support experimentation, and learn from experience. The science of early childhood development shows that investing in quality early learning, social, and health programs yields healthy and capable children, strengthens families, and supports economic stability. Washington's goal is to use this science across the state's early care and education, health, and child welfare and economic support systems to improve outcomes for large populations of young children. Washington partners include the Department of Early Learning, Department of Social and Health Services, Department of Health, Health Care Authority, and Thrive by Five Washington. For more information about Frontiers of Innovation, please visit http://developingchild.harvard.edu/activities/frontiers_of_innovation/
The IDEAS Impact Framework: Theory of Change
 
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Frontiers of Innovation leaders Phil Fisher and Melanie Berry explain theory of change, one of the three components of Frontiers of Innovation’s IDEAS Impact Framework. Together, these components add specificity and interconnectedness to an intervention’s theory, development, implementation, evaluation, and refinement. Learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-model/components/
Urban Thinkscape Project: Activating Public Spaces for Playful Learning
 
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Urban Thinkscape transforms public spaces into opportunities for playful learning by infusing them with activities that challenge the mind while encouraging joyful interactions between children, parents, and caregivers. This video tells the story of Urban Thinkscape's first installation in the Belmont neighborhood of West Philadelphia, PA. For more on the project, see https://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/urban-thinkscape/
Ready4Routines: Building the Skills for Mindful Parenting
 
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This video profiles Ready4Routines, a project which supports parents as they work with their children to build regular family routines. By focusing on real-life daily situations such as bedtime and mealtime, the Ready4Routines intervention seeks to strengthen executive function skills in adults and children, while also increasing predictability within young children’s lives. Learn more about Ready4Routines in this Innovation in Action profile: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/ready4routines/ Read more about Frontiers of Innovation: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/frontiers-of-innovation/ Ready4Routines was created by a collaboration including Acelero Learning, Inc., Westside Infant Network (WIN), CUPS, the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Children's Services of Palm Beach County, Rose F. Kennedy Center Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Montefiore, and Frontiers of Innovation.
Precision in the Learning Through Play Intervention
 
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Members of the Learning Through Play team discuss how they have incorporated precision into their intervention. Precision is one of the guiding principles of Frontiers of Innovation’s IDEAS Innovation Framework. These concepts and approaches guide the work within the framework and represent ways of working that make this approach unique in the field. Learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-approach/guiding-principles/ Learn more about Learning Through Play: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/learning-through-play/
Social and Behavioral Determinants of Toxic Stress
 
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In this science talk, David Williams of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looks at the social and behavioral factors--including socioeconomic status, race, discrimination, and place--that play a role in triggering toxic stress for children and adults. He also discusses what effective solutions for reducing toxic stress and improving health must look like. Williams is the Florence and Laura Norma Professor of Public Health and a Professor of African and African American Studies and Sociology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a Center-affiliated faculty member. To view more resources from the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/
Using Brain Science to Build a New 2Gen Intervention
 
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In a "TED-style talk," Stephanie M. Jones, Marie and Max Kargman Associate Professor in Human Development and Urban Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, describes a new intervention that links the science of brain development with supports for adults and children. The intervention focuses on building executive function skills in children, teachers, and parents by interrupting the stress cycle and putting the front of the brain back in control, so that everyone can go from their stressed self to their best self. To view more resources from the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/
En Breve: La Eficacia de los Programas para la Infancia Temprana
 
05:04
Para información sobre los estudios o las fuentes de datos, visite nuestro sitio web: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu
Brazilian Policymakers Chart a New Course with the Science of Child Development
 
02:20
The mood was buoyant and collegial, but the stakes were high—planning a better future for children in a country experiencing rapid economic growth and wide societal disparities. This group of nearly 50 Brazilian politicians, policymakers, public managers and civil-society leaders had come together for the first time just five days earlier. What united them—both physically and philosophically—was an executive leadership course on early childhood development (ECD), which was hosted by the Center on the Developing Child. They came to Harvard in March 2012 to engage in a week of dialogue on the science of ECD and how effective public leaders can apply this science to some of Brazil's most complex social problems. A concluding course session occurs in Brazil in June, yet the students seemed already to have mastered its intent: a shared understanding of ECD and its importance to policy and practice. Read more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/elp Sign up to receive more information about the Global Children's Initiative's executive leadership programs in early childhood development: http://fs6.formsite.com/developingchild/form38/index.html
Now Is the Time for Innovation and Risk-Taking to Improve Early Childhood Outcomes
 
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This two-minute video features U.S. government, philanthropic, and education leaders speaking about the urgent need for science-based innovation to transform the lives of children and ultimately build a stronger society of healthy and capable adults. At the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child, our goal is to meet this need and achieve breakthrough outcomes for children facing adversity. We do this by: (1) building a dynamic R&D (research and development) platform that supports the design and testing of new intervention strategies; and (2) creating policy, practice, research, and funding environments that demand change and encourage science-based innovation. None of the Center’s work could happen without the generosity of a range of foundations, funding consortia, and individual donors who have made significant investments in the Center since its inception in 2006. To learn more about the Center’s investors, visit http://developingchild.harvard.edu/about/investors. For more information on the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/
The IDEAS Impact Framework: Our Innovation Approach
 
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In order to achieve breakthrough outcomes for children that can be scaled for population-level impact, we need a structured but flexible approach that facilitates program development, implementation, testing, evaluation, and fast-cycle iteration. Frontiers of Innovation’s IDEAS Impact Framework provides that approach, drawing on existing research and development tools and applying them in new ways to set a higher bar for program development and evaluation. Learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-model/
The IDEAS Impact Framework: Segmentation
 
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Members of the Learning Through Play team discuss how they have incorporated segmentation into their intervention. Segmentation is one of the guiding principles of Frontiers of Innovation’s IDEAS Impact Framework. These concepts and approaches guide the work within the framework and represent ways of working that make this approach unique in the field. Learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-approach/guiding-principles/ Learn more about Learning Through Play: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/learning-through-play/
Afraid of Innovation?
 
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Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) focuses on the work of a community of more than 400 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, philanthropists, and experts in systems change from across North America. "Afraid of Innovation?" is one of three videos created specifically to set the stage for discussions at the community's launch in May 2011. For more information about Frontiers of Innovation, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/activities/frontiers_of_innovation/
Why Learning Communities Matter for Improving Child Outcomes
 
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Achieving widespread change in the early childhood field requires tackling an interrelated set of complex social problems. To solve these problems, the field needs a strong community of learning and practice. Through initiatives such as Frontiers of Innovation, the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child is building learning communities that bring together researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and other stakeholders to set goals and metrics for interventions, share results, develop new leaders, and revise and scale interventions to drive breakthrough changes in child outcomes. In this video, Jessica Sager, Co-Founder and Executive Director of All Our Kin, a member organization of Frontiers of Innovation, shares the benefits of participating in the initiative and its learning community. To learn more about the Center on the Developing Child’s learning communities, visit http://developingchild.harvard.edu/collective-change/key-concepts/learning-communities/ To learn more about Frontiers of Innovation and the Center on the Developing Child, visit http://developingchild.harvard.edu.
Why Do Some Children Respond to an Intervention and Others Don't?
 
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In this science talk, formally titled "Beyond Main Effects: Individual Variation in Vulnerability and Resilience," Nathan A. Fox, of the University of Maryland, talks about the limitations of traditional early childhood intervention studies, which examine the effects of programs on large groups of children with the hope that one size fits all. But, because children (and adults) differ in terms of reactivity and self-regulation, new interventions must take into account these individual differences and incorporate individual approaches. Nathan Fox is the Distinguished University Professor, Department of Human Development; and Director, Child Development Laboratory, at the University of Maryland. He is also Science Co-Director of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. To view more resources from the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/
What's Your Inspiration?
 
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Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) focuses on the work of a community of more than 400 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, philanthropists, and experts in systems change from across North America. "What's Your Inspiration?" is one of three videos created specifically to set the stage for discussions at the community's launch in May 2011. For more information about Frontiers of Innovation, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/activities/frontiers_of_innovation/
Testing Innovative Ideas for Improving Early Childhood Outcomes
 
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In this short video, Philip A. Fisher, Ph.D., explains how innovators are using science to test, evaluate, measure, and share their ideas for improving early childhood outcomes and building adult capabilities. To learn more about evaluation and measurement, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/key-concepts/evaluation-and-measurement/ Philip A. Fisher, Ph.D. is a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon and a senior scientist at the Oregon Social Learning Center. He is also a senior fellow at the Center on the Developing Child and a member of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs. For more information on the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/
Learning Through Play: Developing Children’s Executive Function Skills
 
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What are executive function skills and how can children develop them? In this video from the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child, Silvia A. Bunge, Ph.D., from the University of California, Berkeley, explains how learning through play is an evidence-based way to build executive functions in children. Learning Through Play is an intervention strategy utilizing games and play coaching to improve executive function skills in children. To learn more, visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/learning-through-play/
It’s Time for a New Approach
 
01:13
One minute, one big idea: why we need science-based R&D for young children who are facing serious adversity. Learn more about the Center on the Developing at Harvard University, our mission, and our approach to innovation: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/about/
Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development (Bulgarian)
 
01:53
Learning how to cope with adversity is an important part of healthy development. While moderate, short-lived stress responses in the body can promote growth, toxic stress is the strong, unrelieved activation of the body's stress management system in the absence of protective adult support. Without caring adults to buffer children, the unrelenting stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, or severe maternal depression can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health.
What is Innovation?
 
03:31
Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) focuses on the work of a community of more than 400 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, philanthropists, and experts in systems change from across North America. "What is Innovation?" is one of three videos created specifically to set the stage for discussions at the community's launch in May 2011. For more information about Frontiers of Innovation, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/activities/frontiers_of_innovation/
Fast-Cycle Iteration of the Ready4Routines Intervention
 
03:59
Members of the team working on Ready4Routines discuss the process of fast-cycle iteration behind the intervention. Fast-cycle iteration is one of the guiding principles of Frontiers of Innovation’s IDEAS Innovation Framework. These concepts and approaches guide the work within the framework and represent ways of working that make this approach unique in the field. Learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-approach/guiding-principles/ Learn more about Ready4Routines: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/ready4routines/
Using Family Coaching to Break the Cycle of Poverty
 
00:41
The Intergenerational Mobility Project (“The Intergen Project”), a collaborative effort between the Center on the Developing Child and Crittenton Women’s Union (CWU), has set out with a bold mission to disrupt the intergenerational transmission of poverty. In this 40-second video, Elisabeth D. Babcock, President and CEO of the Crittenton Women’s Union, which developed the original coaching model used in the project, briefly explains why addressing the whole family—not just adults—is crucial to breaking the cycle of poverty. To learn more, visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/innovation-application/innovation-in-action/intergen-mobility-project/ For more information on the Center on the Developing Child, please visit: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/
The Science of Child Development Does Not Speak For Itself
 
01:03
Effectively communicating the science of childhood development is a key component to the Center on the Developing Child's mission of achieving breakthrough impacts for kids and families facing adversity. The Center employs cutting-edge techniques to tell the stories, provide the tools, and describe the vision that makes an early childhood innovation agenda real, achievable, scalable, and necessary. This short video highlights some of the many communications tools and products produced by the Center in a variety of forms and formats. Visit the Center's Resource Library to learn more: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/ Sign up for our mailing list to be notified about new resources when they are released: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/contact/

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